SEE IT: Badass Saves American Flag, Thugs Get HARD Lesson In Patriotism (VIDEO)

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One badass patriot is fighting back against these liberal losers who are rioting in major cities, and he stands out for saving the American flag that these idiots were desecrating. The lone patriot was violently attacked, but that did not stop him from saving the flag and teaching those liberal scumbags a really hard lesson they’ll never forget.

Every useful idiot is joining the paid agitators who George Soros has funded to ratchet up hate against President-elect Donald Trump and anyone who supports a peaceful transition. These idiots are the same losers we saw at the Occupy protests, and they are on the payroll of the far leftists who promote anti-American forces.

What these losers don’t get is that patriotic Americans are getting fed-up. Tired after eight years of Barack Obama and the anti-American agenda of the left, one man in Los Angeles went out on Veteran’s Day to save the American flag.

“I went out to the Los Angeles Trump protests on Veterans Day because I saw they were burning and destroying American flags. Decided I was gonna go undercover and try to save one. Found this guy dragging and stomping on one. Waited for a good escape route, then went in to get it. It was my intention to grab it and run, but this guy came right at me,” wrote the lone patriot on his YouTube page.

He continued, “I wasn’t looking for a fight, but he pulled a taser on me. He got me a couple times, but it was just annoying. You can hear me grunt as I punch him in the face. Took no damage. Opened him up a little. Oh well. My love to my brothers and sisters who have served and given the ultimate sacrifice.”

You can hear the chanting, “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Donald Trump has got to go,” and see a tattered American flag being dragged on the ground. The lone patriot, like the lone ranger, grabs it and tells the anti-American thug, “You don’t drag this on the ground!”

World War II veterans attend memorial service on Veteran’s Day (left), Useful idiots march down street in Los Angeles on Veteran’s Day (right)

The thug tasered the badass patriot, who described it as annoying, then he taught the wimpy thug a patriot lesson, punching him in the face as the thug tries to take the flag back. The loser walks away after getting his ass kicked. Lesson learned, don’t desecrate the American flag.

These scumbags have no honor. They preach non-violence, then go out and riot. They preach saving lives but are for partial birth abortion. They are idiots and hypocrites. Anyone with no respect for the flag can expect no respect from real Americans, and real Americans have spoken. Donald Trump is our president. So, beware you liberal scumbags, your time is up. Law and order will be restored and your terrorism will come to an end.
This video is from another protest sorry the video from this protest is removed from

 

700 HP Ford Lightning vs. “AWD UGLY” Silverado

A turbocharged sleeper puts some hurt on a very powerful Ford Lightning.

A 700-horsepower Ford Lightning is nothing to sneeze at, especially in the world of fast trucks. Even though we’re Ford fans here, when something comes along that’s even faster, we have to give credit where credit is due. This video by Salinas Photography shows us the preparation for an illicit drag race between the aforementioned Lightning, and a turbo AWD Silverado nicknamed “AWD UGLY.”

Look past the peeling paint, and the dings and dents you’re used to finding on a decade-old work truck, and there’s a dark, dirty secret lying underneath — a turbocharged small block capable of propelling this unassuming vessel to a nine-second quarter mile.

While the Lightning initially gets the holeshot — despite the Silverado being AWD — the Lighting begins to pull away ever so slightly before the Silverado’s turbo spools up, allowing it to easily walk away from one of the baddest Lightnings out there.

The moral of the story is, don’t judge a book by its cover, and if you’re in Texas, pay extra close attention to beat-up Chevy pickups!
 

Check out This Delicious 1949 Ford F1 Ice Cream Truck!

It wasn’t all about new cars & trucks at the 2017 New York International Auto Show.

There’s something inherently heartwarming about a restored Ford pickup truck. If you think about it, it’s the ultimate feel-good story: a truck that was built to work hard and take abuse, gets a relaxing retirement where it’s appreciated and pampered.

As opposed to restored sports cars, most of which have always lived a privileged life of luxury, it’s specially nostalgic to see trucks which used to live and work in our neighborhoods, be preserved for future generations. This video by JW Burrell quite literally serves up a double dose of nostalgia. It’s a classic 1949 Ford F1 that lived its life as a Good Humor ice cream truck, before being restored to its former smile-giving glory.

While it never lived as hard a life as many of its brethren, it’s been able to provide a cool taste of summertime happiness to generations of ice cream lovers. After all, who doesn’t love hearing the ice cream truck in their neighborhood?

THROWBACK VIDEO Meet the New Ford Ranger

This week’s Throwback video features the first commercial for the all-new Ford Ranger, all of the way back in 1982. The compact Ranger pickup was formally introduced in the U.S. for the 1983 model year and the Motor Company’s goal was to incorporate F-150 styling and F-150 capabilities into a much smaller truck.

The product was the Ranger, and while these tiny pickups didn’t offer the peak capabilities that you got with the likes of the Ford F-150 – this was the toughest small truck that the American market had seen when it was introduced.

This 1982 Ford Ranger commercial (for the 1983 model year) highlights all of the features that made the compact pickup so popular, including a roomy cab and a body construction that allowed it to serve as a proper – although tiny – working pickup. After all, like the commercial says, the Ranger was “built like the big ones, saves like the small ones with up to 39 mpg on the highway.

TRUCKIN’ FAST Roushcharged F-150 Crushes a Mustang

This week’s Truckin’ Fast video features a 2011 Ford F-150 racing on the quarter mile against what looks to be a 2006-2010 Mustang GT.

We don’t know anything about the Mustang, but we know that this F-150 is powered by the 5.0L V8 topped by a Roush supercharger.

I would imagine that there are some other modifications to allow this half ton Ford to make use of the available power including some good, sticky tires, but mods aside – this truck is crazy quick.

As soon as the blown F-150 pulls into the burnout box, it is clear that we are in for a show thanks to a burnout that looks like something out of the old NHRA pro stock truck class.

After the Mustang does a fairly embarrassing burnout and rolls through the beams, forcing the driver to back up in order to stage, the lights come down and the race begins. As soon as it starts, it is over, as the F-150 quickly puts bus lengths in the pony car.

In the end, the F-150 runs an impressive 11.51 at almost 119 miles per hour, pummeling the mid 14 second Mustang.

Crank up your speakers and enjoy!

TIRE SMOKIN’ Old School Ranger Does a Monster Burnout

This week’s Tire Smokin’ video features a second generation Ford Ranger doing a monster burnout.

These older Rangers weren’t known for having powerful engines and this particular compact pickup is powered by a 2.9L V6 and an automatic transmission.

It doesn’t sound like a combination built for tire destruction on a dry road, but this old school Ranger blows my mind with the amount of smoke created in less than a minute.

At first, the driver is holding the Ranger in place and gradually easing into the throttle when, suddenly, both rear tires begin to spin.

The tires are just making a bunch of noise as the little V6 strains to keep them turning, but as the tires heat up, they really get to spinning hard and creating clouds of smoke.

This little truck doesn’t sound great while doing a burnout, but there is no denying that this is one impressive tire destroying session by the old Ranger.

 

Early ’60s 1941 Ford Custom Show Truck Makes a Big Comeback

Styles took a turn for the wild in the early ’60s, and custom rods and show rods helped lead the way. Since the ’50s, builders like George Barris, Dean Jeffries, Ed Roth, Bill Cushenberry, Darryl Starbird, Gene Winfield, and many others were pushing the boundaries of customization further than they had ever been pushed.

In some cases, these extreme custom styles were applied to trucks; the wildly customized Rod & Custom Dream Truck being one famous example. Another was a yellow Ford pickup exhibited at the 1962 San Mateo Auto Show. Owned by Joe Crispin of Redwood City, California, it featured a heavily louvered hood, a 1956 Oldsmobile engine, Eldorado wheels, Corvette taillights with 1959 Cadillac lenses frenched into the rear fenders, and a telephone and TV in the bed. A year later, the truck was back in San Mateo, this time with dark green metalflake paint, flames on the rear fenders and spare tire cover, frenched quad headlights added by Bill Cushenberry, and a new name: Crème De Menthe.

Steve McClain was a little kid at the time, just old enough to be impressed by those far-out show rods. Now he owns Crème De Menthe, a resurrected piece of Bay Area custom history.

Steve learned about the truck from his friend Dave Simonds, who found it at a swap meet in very rough condition. Steve was interested in the truck’s history as a Bay Area custom show vehicle. He offered a trade—the truck for an unfinished project of his own. What he received in his end of the trade was a far cry from a show truck. He brought it home in pieces, finished with a worn orange paintjob. “The truck was a basketcase,” Steve says. “The cab was a mess. All four corners were rusted out with huge holes in them. The floor was rusted out and had large holes in it. The firewall was toast, the back of the cab was dented, and the driver side door had some problems.” The lower portion of the cab was beyond repair. The bed was also in bad shape and had been tubbed when the truck was redone as a Pro Street–style race truck—but the louvered hood, front fenders with Cushenberry’s quad headlights, rear fenders with the custom taillights, and other distinguishing components had survived various rebuilds.

Steve wanted to preserve as much of the original truck as possible. Old timers in the Bay Area who had memories of the truck shared copies of show programs and a July ’62 issue of Rod & Custom magazine featuring photos. Eventually, Steve ordered repro cab corners, floor, and bed from Northern Classic Parts—and a new firewall and kick panels from Bitchin Products. He also bought a MIG welder to do his own sheetmetal repair. He replaced the rusted sheetmetal and added a new front frame section to the boxed Ford ’rails (which have now been powdercoated satin black). The new Mustang II–style front suspension from TCI includes polished tubular A-arms, 2-inch dropped spindles, and coil springs. A Ford 8.8-inch rear with 3.73 gears and limited slip came from an Explorer and is suspended by Posies parallel leafs. Front and rear antiroll bars were added and brakes were upgraded to front and rear discs.

American Classic offers tires with a narrow whitewall just like the tires seen on this truck when it appeared in Oakland and San Mateo back in the day. These 225/75R15 and 165R15 radials are mounted on Wheel Vintiques chrome reverse wheels.

The rebuild was not intended to be a clone of its early ’60s version, and Steve proceeded like a true customizer, making modifications that suited his taste and the truck’s personality. The Olds engine from the early show years was removed years ago. Power is now provided by a 1992 Ford 5.0L HO engine, aspirated by an Edelbrock 600cfm four-barrel mounted on a polished Edelbrock Performer RPM intake. A finned aluminum air cleaner and finned Moon valve covers give the engine a traditional look. The front pulleys are a Vintage Air Front Runner system. Sanderson headers connected to 2-inch pipes with glass pack mufflers handle the exhaust. Faux ripple exhaust pipes extend along the upper edge of the bed, just like they did in the ’60s. A Ford AOD trans built by Nor-Cal Transmission was treated to a shift kit and spins a Ford Explorer driveshaft, modified to fit.

Hot rod builders Brandon Flaner and Aaron Groesbeck had just opened East Bay Speed & Custom in Concord, California, when Brandon was contacted by Steve. Things were progressing on the pickup project, and he needed some professional attention to push it to the next level. The guys at East Bay are young but have a love for early customs (they restored Mickey Himsl’s historic 1929 Ford Pickup a couple years ago) and Brandon said that building the Steve’s ’41 was a fun project. He straightened and refined the bodywork, repaired some of the vintage lead work, and recreated the rear fender metalwork surrounding the custom taillights. Brandon and Freddie Bedolla used House Of Kolor paint to return the truck to its early ’60s green finish, complemented by some lowkey pinstriping. East Bay also rebuilt the aluminum bed tonneau cover and spare tire cover.

Old photos show gold and brown tuck ’n’ roll upholstery in the truck. Bob Divine at Divine’s Custom Interiors brightened up the interior, using light green and vanilla shake colored vinyl to cover the inside panels and the Ford minivan bench seat. The stock instruments were restored, and a trio of Stewart Warner gauges was added to the center of the dash. The steering wheel is a reduced 1940 Ford from Vintique on an ididit column.

In addition to doing his own building and working with Brandon Flaner and other professionals, Steve received help and support from fellow members of the Early Ford V-8 Club. After final assembly and a few weeks of working on final details, Steve, Brandon, Aaron Groesbeck, and Bob Flaner loaded up the 1941 Ford and took it to Pomona for the Grand National Roadster Show.

Spectators loved seeing a genuine early ’60s custom show truck make its 21st century return, and judges selected it for a couple of “Best” awards. If trucks have feelings, being back at the Roadster Show after 50 years must have felt like a homecoming for Crème De Menthe.